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British journalist records scenes of shame at Moria camp on Lesvos

Featured British journalist records scenes of shame at Moria camp on Lesvos

Images not befitting a civilized country and which are a shame for Greece, were registered by a foreign journalist. The videos recorded are published by Buzzfeed.

The video records conditions in the Moria camp on Lesvos. Migrants trying with a bucket to remove the rain water from tents, toilets in miserable conditions, people drowned by dirt and garbage, and spaces designed for far fewer people than they currently host, are but some of the deplorable scenes depicted.

The journalist even recorded migrants trying to gather rainwater in buckets for washing, but also scenes of violence when migrants rise up because of this situation. In particular, as reported by Buzzfeed's reporter last Thursday, immigrants began to attack the metal fence, shouting "Moria no good", with police officers using teargas and forcibly removing at least one of the protesters, as shown in the video.

The journalist on the website, complains that he was attacked and threatened with arrest when he attempted to visit the site. "A policeman demanded to see all the photos and videos to approve the pictures we had taken," writes the reporter. "It is illegal to photograph anything within the fence," the police said.

“Refugees are forced to burn trash at night due to a lack of proper winterization,.” wrote Ryan Broderick on twitter.

Most of his images and video were sent to him by persons inside Moria through an application.

Three months ago, in protest at the worsening conditions inside of Moria, refugees broke through a hole in the fence and decamped into an olive grove next to the prison. Around 200 people, mostly families hoping to escape escalating violence inside the prison, now live outside in summer tents pitched on wooden planks that have been “winterized” via thin tarps. At night, they break off olive branches and burn them, wrote Broderick.

The prison’s original capacity is 2,000, but it's now housing an estimated 7,000 refugees, according to both NGO workers on site and refugees living inside. Refugees are being housed inside what are essentially large shipping containers and in makeshift tents that now line the walkways of the prison. Moria is guarded by both Greek military officers and police.