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Panatha USA celebrates their five year anniversary

The administration of Panatha USA cutting a cake in celebration of their 5 year anniversary.  From left to right:  Spiros Manos (member), Vlasis Anastasiou (president), Louis Filippou (member), Demetris Fakiolas (event organizer), Nikos Bardis (honorary president), Spiros Paximos (member), Nikos Skroumbelos (member) and Yiannis Karassavides (member). The administration of Panatha USA cutting a cake in celebration of their 5 year anniversary. From left to right: Spiros Manos (member), Vlasis Anastasiou (president), Louis Filippou (member), Demetris Fakiolas (event organizer), Nikos Bardis (honorary president), Spiros Paximos (member), Nikos Skroumbelos (member) and Yiannis Karassavides (member).

Translation By Lisa Darilis

The association of Panathinaikos soccer fans in New York, known as "Panatha USA," celebrated their five year anniversary with a special gala, which included traditional Greek appetizers and drinks, such as "tsipouro."

"Panatha USA" was established in 2008 and is housed in the heart of the Greek-American community in Astoria, Queens, NY. Inside their hall can be found a beautiful and abundant display of photographs, archive of publications, and team memorobilia from players, coaches, and other high members of the associations.

The offices of Panatha USA have been visited by famous Panathinaikos players in the past, such as Zelimir Obradovic, Sotiris Ninis, and Nikos Nioplias.

In honoring the association's five years of existence, Yiannis Alafouzos, the president of Panathinaikos, sent a congratulatory letter and gifts, which consisted of a team soccer ball, and a 2013 soccer jersey with all the players' signatures on it. This spread alot of joy and gratitude amongst the Panathinaikos fans here in New York, who remain to be extremely loyal despite their distance across the Atlantic Ocean.

During of the celebration, the Panatha USA administration thanked Mr. Alafouzo, and they jointly headed the festivities for this "tsipourovradia," or night of tsipouro drinking, which continued well into the late hours of the night.